Temporary Shade

For Park(ing) Day I have come up with a luxury that is often void between going from a car to a building, shade. During the hot summer months there is very little shade between buildings, so it takes a lot of strength, and sometimes courage, in order to even walk from one building to the next without shade, or air conditioning. I believe that this is why so many people rely on vehicle transportation to get around the valley, even if their destination isn't that far away. This is why shade structures should be used in order to promote a way for people to get outside, even when it's hot. Normal shade structures though aren't very interesting, and don't promote people to possible linger in its' vicinity. People tend to just walk underneath without paying much attention to what is actually creating the shade. This is why I propose a way to make the shade structure become more than just creating shade, but by possibly guiding people through the structure itself.

 Image courtesy of Mark Talbot and Tyler Survant. Temporary Pavilion. Image from http://www.archdaily.com.

Image courtesy of Mark Talbot and Tyler Survant. Temporary Pavilion. Image from http://www.archdaily.com.

 Image courtesy of Mark Talbot and Tyler Survant. Temporary Pavilion Elevation. Image from http://www.archdaily.com.

Image courtesy of Mark Talbot and Tyler Survant. Temporary Pavilion Elevation. Image from http://www.archdaily.com.

Now I have looked through some examples of tensile strength shade structures, the ones that have stretched fabric overhead, and a majority don't promote a lingering feeling. That is until I found Mark Talbot's and Tyler Survant's Temporary Pavilion. This is a shade structure that I found on ArchDaily.com and shows how a tensile strength shade structure can become more than just something to create shade. As you can see the structure actually creates an enclosure, marked in red, over a marked path. This enclosure limits people to staying on the path, marked in green, instead of possibly walking through the woods. This is the type of thing I was looking for, a way that the structure could influence the way people move, thereby forcing them to notice it, and not simply walk through. But after looking through this some more I found that the way this was constructed is quite cost prohibitive for it to be a small temporary shade structure. It is made of aircraft cable's and reflective greenhouse tarp that are tied to the surrounding trees. So how can we create a more cost effective small shade structure, just like this.

 No-Sew Spandex Tensile Shade Structure. Photographer unknown. Image from http://www.instructables.com/id/No-Sew-Spandex-Tensile-Shade-Structure/.

No-Sew Spandex Tensile Shade Structure. Photographer unknown. Image from http://www.instructables.com/id/No-Sew-Spandex-Tensile-Shade-Structure/.

As you can see from the photo above these guys did it with some stretched lyrca fabric, some rope, a few cinderblocks, and some metal piping. The metal piping  were used to create the high points in the structure whereas the cinderblocks and rope were used to pull the fabric into the shape you see before you. Now with this technique you can create any shape that you want. As such we can create a shade structure that can influence people to notice what is causing shade, as well as providing the luxury of that shade. And with this we can bring people outside more often by giving them something interesting that they will notice, as well as shade to help them keep cool.